Michael-Paul Schallmo, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry

Michael-Paul Schallmo

Contact Info

schal110@umn.edu

Office Phone 612-273-9130

Administrative Assistant Name
Gregg Helmberger

Administrative Phone
612-273-9714

Administrative Email
helmb008@umn.edu

Administrative Fax Number
612-273-9779

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry


PhD, Neuroscience, University of Minnesota,Twin Cities

BS, Brain, Behavior, and Cognitive Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Summary

Dr. Schallmo began his research career in the lab of Dr. Scott A. Langenecker in the Neuropsychology Division at the University of Michigan. There he completed an honors thesis, using functional MRI to study word list learning as part of his B.S. in Brain, Behavior, and Cognitive Science. Dr. Schallmo then completed his Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota, working in the lab of Dr. Cheryl A. Olman (Department of Psychology). His doctoral work used functional MRI and behavioral psychophysics to examine how early visual processing (e.g., contrast perception) is affected by psychosis. Next, Dr. Schallmo worked as a post-doctoral research associate in the lab of Dr. Scott O. Murray in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. This work examined how low-level vision (e.g., motion perception) is affected by autism spectrum disorder, using methods such as functional MRI, MR spectroscopy, and EEG. He joined the Psychiatry Department as an Assistant Professor in August 2017, as part of a team working on the Psychosis Human Connectome Project.

Awards & Recognition

  • Postdoctoral NRSA – National Institute of Health
  • Graduate Research Fellowship – National Science Foundation
  • Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship – UMN Graduate School
  • Graduate School Fellowship – University of Minnesota

Research

Research Summary/Interests

Dr. Schallmo's interests include:

  1. Disrupted perception in psychosis and autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
  2. The role of different neurotransmitters (e.g., GABA, glutamate) in psychosis and ASD
  3. Visual neuroscience as a tool to examine specific hypotheses about the neural mechanisms of psychiatric disorders
  4. Combining methods (e.g., functional MRI, EEG, MR spectroscopy, visual psychophysics, pharmacology) to study a single research question in human subjects

Publications

Schallmo, M-P., Grant, A.N., Burton, P.C., Olman, C.A. (2016). The effects of orientation and attention during surround suppression of small image features: A 7 Tesla fMRI study. Journal of Vision. 16(10), 19, p. 1-21. PMC5015919

Schallmo, M-P., Murray, S.O. (2016). Identifying separate components of surround suppression. Journal of Vision. 16(1), 2, p. 1-12. PMC4743711

Schallmo, M-P., Sponheim, S.R., Olman, C.A. (2015). Reduced contextual effects on visual contrast perception in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Psychological Medicine. 45(16), p. 3527-3537. PMC4624017

Schallmo, M-P., Kassel, M.T., Weisenbach, S.L., Walker, S.J., Guidotti-Breting, L.M., Rao, J.A., Hazlett, K.E., Considine, C.M., Sethi, G., Vats, N., Pecina, M., Welsh, R.C., Starkman, M.N., Giordani, B., Langenecker, S.A. (2015). A new semantic list learning task to probe functioning of the Papez circuit. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 37(8), p. 816-833. PMC5065919

Schallmo, M-P., Sponheim, S.R., Olman, C.A. (2013). Abnormal contextual modulation of visual contour detection in patients with schizophrenia. PLOS ONE. 8(6), p. e68090. PMC3688981